Homemade Carp Bait Making For Beginners And Experienced Anglers – Secrets Of Semolina Part 1!


If you are a carp fishing beginner or an experienced bait maker you can always learn something that will make a huge difference to your success! Semolina is one of the most used carp bait ingredients in recipes but why is this? Semolina carbohydrates are utilised for energy, and other roles and nutritional functions too! Semolina is one of the basics of carp baits so find out deeper details on what it is, how it is best used and why carp like it!

It is my assumption that besides eggs and many other common kitchen and cooking foods that pioneering bait makers tried in their carp baits, that semolina was something people tried and found in the beginning to be functionally useful. Semolina is certainly a carrier substance which means it can be exploited in boilies and other baits by utilising its capacity to absorb any of many diverse liquids.

Winter or in fact any other time of year is great for semolina as it is such an invaluable carrier for whatever stimulating liquids within your baits plus it helps makes bait more economical!

Just add boiling water to semolina powder and you will notice how this reacts with the gluten, lectin, starches etc in it making it bind together. When it cools you can take out a tasty solid mass which was once a flowing granular powder! I’m sure like me, many homemade bait makers notice this property and utilise this property! Of course anyone who has ever added sugar or strawberry jam or maple syrup, or cinnamon to their semolina knows how useful semolina is as a carrier for more palatable substances which make you eat more!

Semolina is as its simplest a functional binding bulking ingredient not merely for boilies or pastes but a myriad of ground bait formats and other baits too. Its use as a cheap, economical binder means it has been a mainstay in carp baits for decades. I do wander why semolina has been used like this as opposed to other carbohydrate binders and starch and other energy sources and I have some personal suggestions having used both hard and soft forms of wheat flours and meals for decades.

Other commonly sources used popularly at various times and in various countries are ordinary and whole meal wheat flour, layers mash and other wheat-rich crushed grain and seed bird and pet feeds, maize and maize meal, soya flours and soya meals, peanut flours and other nut meals, and tiger nut flours and meals rice flour, potato flour, corn starch, custard powder, Lamlac, Vitamealo and other energy-rich lower protein milk powders. Also:…



Source by Tim F. Richardson

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